Developing a co-­design methodology for school ground greening

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Other Title
Authors
Wake, Sue
Wang, Qian
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Grantor
Date
2016-02
Supervisors
Type
Conference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedings
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
school grounds
sustainability education
greening schools
school ground greening
primary schools
co-design
landscape architecture
Citation
Wake, S. J., & Wang, Q. (2016, February). Developing a co-­design methodology for school ground greening. S. Birdsall & S. J. Wake (Ed.), Edited Proceedings of the New Zealand Association of Environmental Education Biennial Conference: Activate, Agitate, Advocate. 9-12 February, University of Auckland (pp.24-31).
Abstract
If school  grounds  are  developed  as  ecologically  diverse  and  environmentally  stimulating  places  that  encourage   student  engagement and learning,  they  can  contribute  to  children demonstrating,what  researchers  such  as  Chawla   and  Cushing  (2007)  have  termed, pro-environmental  behaviour.    School  ground  greening  is  the  general  term  used  for   the  transformation  of  school  grounds from  asphalt, concrete  and  grass  to  spaces  that  invite children  to  explore  and   experiment  (Dyment,  2005),and  a  significant  rationale  for  its current popularity  is  the  potential  for  developing   positive  environmental  values  and  attitudes as  a  result  of  these  nature  encounters  (Williams  & Brown,  2012).   Further,  if  children  participate  in  the  design  of  these  environments  it  can  foster creativity  and imagination,  develop   communication  and  thinking  skills,  and  engender  ownership, sharing  and  belonging  (Christidou,  Tsevreni,  Epitropou   &  Kittas,  2013).   Architectural  codesign  with  children  may  be  defined  as  them working  directly  and  collaboratively   with  designers to  contribute  and make decisions  within  the  design  process,and  this  kind  of  spatial  advocacy  is   known  to  be  empowering (Parnell,  2014). This  presentation  considers  different  ways  that  co-design  could  occur  within  the  school  environment  as  part  of  a   study investigating how  landscape  architects  can work  with  schools  to  help  with  school  ground  greening  projects   that  promote  environmental  and design  learning.  
Publisher
Link to ePress publication
DOI
Copyright holder
Copyright notice
All rights reserved
Copyright license
Available online at
This item appears in: