Status and implementation of integrated green-grey infrastructure in residential street retrofitting

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Wang, Xinxin
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2022-12-02
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Conference Contribution - Oral Presentation
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New Zealand
residential streets
integrated green-grey infrastructure (IGGI)
retrofitting
literature reviews
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Wang, X. (2022, December, 2). Status and implementation of integrated green-grey infrastructure in residential street retrofitting. Research stage: 3rd year of a 6-year part-time PhD study [Paper presentation]. SOLA’s Post‐Graduate Symposium, Lincoln University, New Zealand
Abstract
Since the early 20th century, residential streets in low-density suburban neighbourhoods in developed countries have been designed as car-oriented, wide, paved spaces. These conventionally designed streets have increasingly been associated with environmental and social problems. These problems may be mitigated by integrated green-grey infrastructure (IGGI), an innovative infrastructure that combines vegetation features with non-living materials to achieve multiple functions. However, there is little literature on IGGI development and implementation in residential street retrofits. This research aims to fill in this gap in the current landscape research. It will investigate the research status of integrated green-grey infrastructure in residential street retrofitting. In addition, it will determine the extent to which integrated green and grey infrastructures are implemented in retrofits. Furthermore, it will identify enablers and barriers to integrated green-grey infrastructure implementation. The study will consist of two phases. First, it will undertake a systematic review of the literature to determine the research status of integrated green-grey infrastructure. Second, using New Zealand streets as case studies, key informants will be interviewed to identify the extent of, enablers for, and barriers to the implementation of integrated green-grey infrastructure. The outcome of this research will draw a clear picture of IGGI research and implementation at the street level. Hence, it will be relevant for researchers, policymakers and landscape design practitioners.
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