The dichotomy between final year undergraduate New Zealand nursing students’ reports of learning and their practice intentions in aged residential care: challenges and surprises.

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Authors
Honeyfield, Judith
Sims, Deborah
Foster, Pam
Proverbs, Adam
Akhtaruzzaman, Muhammad
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Grantor
Date
2023
Supervisors
Type
Conference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedings
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
Nursing retention
Placement roles
Nursing leadership
Aged residental care
Nursing curriculum
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
Honeyfield, J., Sims, D., Foster, P., Proverbs, A., & Akhtaruzzaman, M. (2023). The dichotomy between final year undergraduate New Zealand nursing students’ reports of learning and their practice intentions in aged residential care: challenges and surprises. In International Academic Forum(Eds.), The Asian Conference on Education & International Development 2023 Official Conference Proceedings (pp.9-25). Tokyo, Japan: IAFOR. https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2189-101X.2023.2
Abstract
The aged healthcare sector internationally is facing a crisis in attracting and retaining a nurse workforce. Alongside the global rise in longevity, the sector is experiencing an increasing demand on their services. Yet undergraduate nursing students are often reluctant to consider aged residential care (ARC) with perceptions that a lack of opportunities, compared to hospital positions, will mean that their education and high-tech skills are underutilised. This paper describes our institution’s atypical response of offering ARC practicums in both the first and third years of study and our desire to discover students’ perceptions of their learning and experience. Where the first-year experience allows students to undertake fundamental care, the final, month-long year 3 placement, focuses on managing complex care, enhancing nursing leadership and management practices and quality improvement. This mixed method study collected questionnaire data from 72 of 96 (75%) year three Bachelor of Nursing students and facilitated four focus groups involving 38 students. Findings included both congruent and disparate themes from contemporary literature on this subject. Whilst students reported some mixed experiences, they noted improved confidence in applying a range of knowledge and skills in response to encountered needs. Thirty percent said that they were more likely to choose the ARC sector as a career specialty. The biggest factor to which they attributed this positive shift was their interaction with registered nurses and managers. This paper shares our reflections on implications for how we can better prepare our students and educators for placement roles, skills and responsibilities and support the sector.
Publisher
Link to ePress publication
DOI
https://doi.org/10.22492/issn.2189-101X.2023.2
Copyright holder
copyright ACEID
Copyright notice
This paper is part of the ACEID 2023 conference proceedings
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