Bicultural, and specifically Māori, values in a diverse Aotearoa/New Zealand workplace

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Authors
Niha, Maania
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Master of Applied Management
Grantor
Southern Institute of Technology (SIT)
Date
2021
Supervisors
Hill, Robyn
Type
Masters Thesis
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
Aotearoa
New Zealand
workplace diversity
biculturalism
multiculturalism
tikanga Māori
Treaty of Waitangi (1840)
Māori values and protocols
Citation
Niha, M. (2021). Bicultural, and specifically Māori, values in a diverse Aotearoa/New Zealand workplace. (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Applied Management). Southern Institute of Technology (SIT), New Zealand. https://hdl.handle.net/10652/5638
Abstract
RESEARCH QUESTION What strategies are required to instill and embed bicultural, and specifically Māori, values in a diverse Aotearoa/NZ workplace? iINVESTIGATIVE QUESTIONS IQ1 How can a diverse Aotearoa/NZ workplace instill and embed bicultural, and specifically Māori, values? IQ2 What recommendations can be made to instill and embed bicultural, and specifically Māori, values in a diverse Aotearoa/NZ workplace? IQ3 Where does the responsibility lie to instill and embed bicultural, and specifically Māori, values in a diverse Aotearoa/NZ workplace? ABSTRACT Aotearoa has a unique bicultural foundation and increasingly diverse demographics, influencing Aotearoa and diverse workplaces. To identify the importance, and determine factors that limit organisations, in the development and implementation of bicultural, and specifically Māori, values in a diverse Aotearoa/New Zealand (NZ) workplace was the focus of this research. In this predominantly qualitative, mixed methods, exploratory case study, a questionnaire and focus groups were used. Three diverse socially responsible organisations participated with 47 valid responses from 58 questionnaire respondents, and 11 executive/leadership team members for focus groups. The study investigated strategies, approaches and recommendations needed; factors that limit; and responsibilities. As a diverse socially responsible organisation, the research identified social responsibility as an ethical framework alongside complementary Te Tirti o Waitangi (Te Tiriti) and Te Tiriti principles; and stakeholder theory and analysis were beneficial to understand diverse stakeholders needs. Major results found similar and contrasting perspectives relating to understanding and knowledge of Māori values, bicultural values, Te Tiriti, Te Tiriti principles, and Aotearoa bicultural foundation, biculturalism and multiculturalism, including importance of these to individuals and perceptions of their organisation. The research identified that positive influences and impacts can increase understanding and knowledge, and negative factors, barriers and challenges can limit organisations; however, all individuals have responsibility, led by leadership and management. Significant findings were three key, essential categories, (a) frameworks, (b) organisational practices, (c) stakeholders, identified and needed for developing and implementing bicultural, and specifically Māori, values in a diverse Aotearoa/NZ workplace. This study contributes to Aotearoa research on Māori values, bicultural values, Te Tiriti, Aotearoa bicultural foundation, biculturalism and multiculturalism, and diverse Aotearoa workplaces.
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Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International
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