'It’s just so bloody hard’ : recommendations for improving health interventions and maternity support services for disabled women

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Authors
Payne, Deborah
Guerin, Bernadette
McPherson, Kathryn
Roy, Dianne
Giddings, Lynne
Farquhar, Cindy
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Grantor
Date
2016-08
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Type
Conference Contribution - Oral Presentation
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
disabled women
disabled motherhood
pregnant disabled women
maternity services
midwifery
women with disabilities having children
maternity support
surveys
disability awareness in health professionals
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
Payne, D., Guerin, B. M., McPherson, K., Roy, D. E., Giddings, L. S., & Farquhar, C. (2016, August). It’s just so bloody hard’ - Recommendations for improving health interventions and maternity support services for disabled women. Paper presented at 14th New Zealand College of Midwives Conference Biennial Conference 2016, Auckland, New Zealand.
Abstract
Paucity of information about Aotearoa/New Zealand disabled women’s experiences of becoming mothers and the enablers and barriers they may face. • Overseas studies show that disabled women do encounter physical, attitudinal barriers. • Studies have also indicated that health professionals lack the knowledge and experience to provide appropriate care. • 2014 Maternity Consumer Survey found that disabled women were less satisfied overall with their maternity care in comparison to non- disabled women. Study aims 1. To investigate the experiences of women with either physical disabilities or sensory impairments in choosing whether to become mothers, including the barriers and facilitators to positive experiences of disabled motherhood; 2. To investigate the perspectives of health care professionals regarding the facilitators and barriers to providing best quality maternity and child care services for disabled women; and 3. To seek consensus on priority actions and strategies towards our overall aim of improving health outcomes for disabled women during pregnancy, childbirth and early childcare.
Publisher
New Zealand College of Midwives
Link to ePress publication
DOI
Doi.10.1080/09638288.2016.1226971
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