Evaluating the application of Māori design principles to urban neighbourhood development projects to develop a Kaupapa Māori design framework and assessment tools

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Other Title
Authors
Kake, Bonnie Jade
Paul, Jackie
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Grantor
Date
2018
Supervisors
Type
Conference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedings
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
Aotearoa
housing
urban regeneration
Te Aranga Design Principles
Māori design
community development
research methodology
neighbourhoods
Tāmaki Makaurau (N.Z.)
Auckland (N.Z.)
Māori housing
Kaupapa Māori
New Zealand
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
Kake, J., & Paul, J. (2018). Evaluating the application of Māori design principles to urban neighbourhood development projects to develop a Kaupapa Māori design framework and assessment tools. 2018 Urbanism New Zealand Conference (pp. 12). Retrieved from http://www.urbanismnz.co.nz/
Abstract
AIMS/PURPOSE: This paper discusses and evaluates the application of Te Aranga and other kaupapa Māori design principles (principles derived from a Māori worldview and incorporating Māori knowledge and values) to urban neighbourhood development projects. By critically interrogating the application of established design principles, this project seeks to the evaluate their spatial application and to assess actual vs anticipated social outcomes. This study aims to support developers, designers, and planners working alongside mana whenua (local iwi or hapū who maintain customary authority over an identified area) and mataawaka communities (Māori living within in a given region who do not belong to a mana whenua group) to develop better spatial design processes, and to deliver better social outcomes at a neighbourhood scale. METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: The research involves the development of a formal method of evaluation to assess the spatial and social outcomes realized through the application of Māori design principles to urban neighbourhood development/regeneration projects. Through the testing phase, a mixture of quantitative (through onsite observation and analysis of desktop material, such as master plans and architectural drawings) and qualitative (through the post-occupancy evaluation walk-through interviews with residents and key informants) data will be collected and analysed using the prototype assessment tool. The research has four distinct phases: (i) Synthesis of existing design principles to develop a kaupapa Māori neighbourhood design framework (ii) Development of a prototype spatial analysis/observation tool (iii) Development of a prototype post-occupancy evaluation tool (iv) Testing tools using built examples. RESEARCH IMPLICATIONS: Māori design principles, such as Te Aranga, have the potential to significantly impact future neighbourhood regeneration and housing developments. Through a better understanding of implementation/application, methodologies and assessment tools which are aligned with a values-based approach can be developed to inform more culturally attuned spatial design processes and outcomes.
Publisher
Building Better Homes, Towns and Cities (BBHTC)
Link to ePress publication
DOI
Copyright holder
Authors
Copyright notice
All rights reserved
Copyright license
This item appears in: