A home for your worst days: The architecture of substance rehabilitation

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Authors
O'Neil, Ciaran Richard
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Master of Architecture (Professional)
Grantor
Unitec, Te Pūkenga – New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology
Date
2022-10
Supervisors
Wagner, Cesar
Budgett, Jeanette
Type
Masters Thesis
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
Auckland CBD (N.Z.)
New Zealand
drug addicts
alcoholics
rehabilitation from substance abuse
rehabilitation centre design
health architecture
Te Aranga Design Principles
salutogenic design
substance abuse
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
O'Neil, C.R. (2022). A home for your worst days: The architecture of substance rehabilitation (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec, Te Pūkenga - New Zealand Institute of Skills and Technology https://hdl.handle.net/10652/6080
Abstract
RESEARCH QUESTION How can the architecture of an inner-city rehab be designed to create a healing environment for temporary residents recovering from addiction? ABSTRACT Drug and alcohol addiction affects a significant number of New Zealanders. Not only can it destroy the lives of those addicted, but it also ruins the lives of those closest to them. People trying to recover from addiction need a place where they can get support for as long as they need, without burdening the other people in their lives too much. A sober-living rehabilitation house provides this safe and healing space where addicts can stay amongst their peers for a period of time. This research project looks into the idea of healing architecture and how salutogenic architecture and biophilic design can encourage a holistic recovery while supporting general human health and well-being through thoughtful planning and connections to nature. This project investigates how the philosophy of phenomenology might create a building where guests feel relaxed and at home. Furthermore, the facility aims to instil a sense of community for residents struggling with addiction, shame and depression while also forming a positive connection to the wider community and fit in with its urban context. The final design aims to create architecture that forms a supportive backdrop for people on their rehabilitation journey, away from dependency on drugs and alcohol, away from anxiety and depression, and towards a positive new outlook on life. Site: 21 Emily Place, Auckland CDB, New Zealand
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