Quantity surveyors perceptions of the role and capability of tertiary education in New Zealand

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Authors
Baker, C.
Davies, Kathryn
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Date
2013
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Conference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedings
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
quantity surveying
educational capability
industry role
academic role
Citation
Baker, C., and Davies, K. (2013). Quantity surveyors perceptions of the role and capability of tertiary education in New Zealand. 38th Annual Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA) Conference. 20-22 Nov 2013; Auckland, New Zealand.(Ed.)
Abstract
Although in the past there have been various pathways into the Quantity Surveying profession in New Zealand, the most common route currently is through a Diploma or Degree in Quantity Surveying or Construction Economics. Tertiary courses seek to instil the fundamental skills and knowledge that are needed within the Quantity Surveying profession, which are then developed throughout an individual’s career. However, the adequacy of education for the profession is frequently questioned by practitioners, and there is ongoing debate about the role of tertiary courses and their ability to deliver successful graduates. In order to assess Quantity Surveyors’ perceptions of the role and capability of tertiary education in New Zealand, an online survey was carried out with the support of the New Zealand Institute of Quantity Surveyors (NZIQS). Of the 75 practising QSs who participated in the survey, the majority believed that the role of tertiary education is to focus on the basic technical abilities needed within the Quantity Surveying profession, leaving more advanced skills and knowledge to be developed once graduates are employed in the industry. Overall, respondents considered that existing tertiary courses adequately provide the education needed to start in the Quantity Surveying profession, although a common recurring theme was the need for greater collaboration between tertiary providers, industry and professional institutions to determine what is taught. Views offered regarding the importance of various skills and types of knowledge required were often contradictory, indicating that consensus on the role and function of tertiary education for the profession is not so easily obtained.
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Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA)
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Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA)
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