Co-governance and local empowerment? Conservation Partnership Frameworks and Marine Protection at Mimiwhangata, New Zealand

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Authors
Dodson, Giles
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Grantor
Date
2014-11-07
Supervisors
Type
Journal Article
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
Mimiwhangata Marine Park (N.Z.)
marine conservation
community engagement
Māori
indigenous peoples
development policies
civil society
partnerships
participation
environment (built and natural)
governance and public policy
Aotearoa
New Zealand
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
Giles Dodson (2014) Co-Governance and Local Empowerment? Conservation Partnership Frameworks and Marine Protection at Mimiwhangata, New Zealand, Society & Natural Resources: An International Journal, 27:5, 521-539, DOI: 10.1080/08941920.2013.861560
Abstract
This study examines the conservation partnership activities conducted as part of the Mimiwhangata marine reserve project. This project involved the formation of a partnership between the Department of Conservation (DOC) and an indigenous Maori community, who sought to establish and co-govern a marine reserve at Mimiwhangata, New Zealand (NZ). Drawing on the discourse of contemporary Treaty of Waitangi politics, the article argues that participatory processes can be effective means through which to pursue both positive conservation and social outcomes. However, unless the appropriate legislative framework exists in which meaningful ongoing community involvement and control can be constituted, partnership-based conservation is unlikely to deliver substantial conservation or social gains. Fundamental issues concerning indigenous rights, authority, and control persist within the “partnership” framework, which existing marine reserve governance mechanisms in New Zealand do not resolve
Publisher
Routledge
Link to ePress publication
DOI
DOI:10.1080/08941920.2013.861560
Copyright holder
Routledge
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© Taylor & Francis
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