The effect of osteopathic manipulative techniques on diaphragm movement and respiratory function in asymptomatic subjects

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Authors
Hosking, Sharon
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Degree
Master of Osteopathy
Grantor
Unitec Institute of Technology
Date
2009
Supervisors
Moran, Robert
Hilton, Craig
Type
Masters Thesis
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
abdominal diaphragm
thoracic diaphragm
osteopathic medicine
manipulation
spirometry
ultrasound imaging (USI)
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
Hosking, S. (2009). The effect of osteopathic manipulative techniques on diaphragm movement and respiratory function in asymptomatic subjects. (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Osteopathy). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/1386
Abstract
Title: The effect of osteopathic manipulative techniques on diaphragm movement and respiratory function in asymptomatic subjects. Objective: To examine the effect of osteopathic manipulative (OM) techniques on diaphragm movement in asymptomatic subjects. Methods: A randomized, controlled, pre and post-test experimental design was conducted on 30 healthy individuals (15 males and 15 females; age range 20-45 years, (Mean ± SD) 27.7 ± 4.5y. The OM technique protocol consisted of three standardized OM techniques applied to anatomical attachment areas of the diaphragm. The control group did not receive any technique, but were required to lie quietly for seven minutes, the same length of time it took to perform the OM techniques. Ultrasound and spirometry measures were taken before and after OM techniques and control procedures. Data from pre and post-test measurements of the control group was used to establish a baseline. Results: Data from 28 subjects was analyzed and showed a substantial increase in effect size in the treatment group compared to the control. Ultrasound measures in the treatment group showed a 'large' effect in breathing rate (Br/min) and a 'moderate' effect in pause (P) phase. Spirometry measures in the treatment group showed a 'large' effect in TV and a 'moderate' effect in PEF. The control group showed 'small' and 'trivial' effects across all ultrasound and spirometry measures. Conclusion: Three standardized OM techniques applied to anatomical attachment areas of the diaphragm produced substantial changes in diaphragm rate of movement measured by ultrasound and spirometry measures in asymptomatic individuals. Although the current study was underpowered, the observed effects demonstrate that improvements were achieved.
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