Design of change in cycle commuting

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Authors
McKernon, Stephen
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Degree
Master of Design Management
Grantor
Unitec Institute of Technology
Date
2007
Supervisors
Halliday, Nicola
Rees, David
Type
Masters Dissertation
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Keyword
cycle commuting
social dynamics
environmental sustainability
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Citation
McKernon, S. (2007). Design of change in cycle commuting. Unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree of Master of Design Management, Unitec New Zealand, New Zealand.
Abstract
Cycle commuting is well-recognised but marginal in most English-speaking countries, following considerable popularity in the first half of the twentieth century. In recent decades, it has found favour among transport policy makers as a part solution to problems arising from the dominance of the motor car. As a mode of urban transport, the bicycle offers public health, economic, social, ecological, and quality-of-life advantages to both users and non-users. Auckland was one of the first New Zealand cities to have a cycle strategy, but has seen a slow decline in cycling since then. This thesis investigates the nature of cycle commuting as a social phenomenon, using the social systems theory of Niklas Luhmann to develop an analysis of its culture and social dynamics in New Zealand. It then deploys a range of systems design tools, including scenarios, causal loop diagrams, and system dynamics modeling, to develop an understanding of how to foster cycle commuting in Auckland. The final output is a set of recommendations towards doubling the proportion of cycle commuters by 2016.
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