Longitudinal sleep patterns of problematic and non-problematic infant sleepers

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Authors
Jefferies, LeeAnn Faith
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Degree
Master of Osteopathy
Grantor
Unitec Institute of Technology
Date
2014
Supervisors
Bacon, Catherine
Mannion, Jamie
Type
Masters Dissertation
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
infant
sleep
problematic
birth experience
sleep diaries
longitudinal
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
Jefferies, L.F. (2014). Longitudinal sleep patterns of problematic and non-problematic infant sleepers. An unpublished research project submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Osteopathy, Unitec Institute of Technology.
Abstract
This study describes and compares the sleep patterns of parentally-perceived problematic and non-problematic infant sleepers aged 3 to 13 months. Parents of 63 infants completed brief infant sleep questionnaires (BISQ) and 7-day sleep diaries each month for up to 3 months. Problematic sleepers showed poorer sleep quality and quantity than their non-problematic counterparts over the 3-month period. For problematic sleepers, diaries indicated 1.3 ± 0.4 (mean ± SE) more night wakes per night (p=0.002), 0.92 ± 0.3 hours less total sleep over 24 hours (p=0.008), shorter sleep periods by 2.0 ± 0.7 hours (p=0.009), 0.54 ± 0.3 hours less night-time sleep (p=0.046) and more time awake between 2200 – 0600 by 0.27 ± 0.09 hours (p=0.05) and by 0.41 ± 0.1 hours (p=0.009) from BISQ. Expected developmental changes were observed in both groups, with day naps decreasing from 3.0 ± 0.1 to 2.5 ± 0.1 (p<0.001), night wakes decreasing from 2.1 ± 0.2 to 1.6 ± 0.2 per night (p=0.008), and sleep periods lengthening on average from 8.8 ± 0.4 to 9.8 ± 0.4 hours per night (p=0.007) over 3 months. Problematic sleepers were more likely to have experienced a birth with intervention (forceps, ventouse or caesarean) than non-problematic sleepers (75% versus 58%; p=0.03). This study indicates that problematic sleepers have increased sleep fragmentation and sleep deficit when compared to non-problematic sleepers, leading to poorer sleep quality and quantity. Perinatal factors may also contribute to problematic sleep patterns in infants.
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