More than words : an investigation into the patient experience of informed consent in osteopathy

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Authors
Kilpin, Caitlin Anna-Maria
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Degree
Master of Osteopathy
Grantor
Unitec Institute of Technology
Date
2018
Supervisors
Sheehan, Dale
Hart, Alexandra
Type
Masters Thesis
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
New Zealand
osteopathic patients
patients
informed consent
osteopaths and patients
information exchange
active engagement
osteopathic clinics
osteopathic medicine
Citation
Kilpin, C. A-M. (2018) More than words: An investigation into the patient experience of informed consent in osteopathy (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Osteopathy). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4676
Abstract
RESEARCH QUESTION: What are the experiences of informed consent in a New Zealand clinical osteopathic consultation for six patients? ABSTRACT: Medical informed consent is described as permission to perform mutually agreed upon examination and treatment after understanding the risks and benefits of multiple options. The informed consent process is at the heart of patient centred care and ethical practice in all health professions, yet there is a limited research base about patients' lived experience of informed consent in an osteopathic context. Using semi-structured interviews, this study explored how six patients experience the informed consent process in a single New Zealand osteopathic clinical setting. Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA) was used to analyse these experiences. The results show that information exchange and active patient engagement play significant roles. The patients in this study have little recollection of an initial and explicit consent process but instead, describe the ongoing process of consent as their treatment progresses. Information from this research can be used to help osteopaths understand the patient experience of consent which could lead a greater collaboration between patient and practitioner.
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