Efficacy of the ‘Still technique’ on dorsiflexion at the talocrural joint in patients with a history of ankle injury

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Authors
Taylor, Nicholas
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Degree
Master of Osteopathy
Grantor
Unitec Institute of Technology
Date
2008
Supervisors
Moran, Robert
Stewart, Andrew
Type
Masters Dissertation
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
ankle joints
Still technique
dorsiflexion
range of motion (ROM)
osteopathic medicine
Citation
Taylor, N. (2008). Efficacy of the ‘Still technique’ on dorsiflexion at the talocrural joint in patients with a history of ankle injury. Unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the degree of Master of Osteopathy, Unitec Institute of Technology, New Zealand.
Abstract
Background and Objectives: To determine the efficacy of an osteopathic technique (‘Still Technique’) on range of motion at the talocrural joint in individuals with a history of ankle injury. This dissertation has two sections. Section I contains a review the literature regarding investigation on range of motion at the talocrural joint. Section II consists of a manuscript of a study investigating the ‘Still Technique’ on talocrural joint range of motion. Design: A randomised, controlled, blinded, experimental study. Subjects: Thirty-two volunteers (19 males, 13 females; mean age=28.3 SD= 8.4) with a history of ankle injury from a university population, aged between 18 and 47 years. Methods: Subjects with a history of ankle injury were randomly allocated to control and experimental groups. Subjects in the experimental group received three consecutive applications of ‘the Still Technique’ at the talocrural joint within a single session. Those in the control group received a sham intervention designed to mimic the ‘Still Technique’. Pre-test and post-test measures of passive dorsiflexion ROM were collected using a magnetometer. Results: A comparison of the pre and post intervention control group (n=16) means revealed a mean change of 1.5º (p= 0.163; d= 0.10) (95% CI= -0.6 to 3.6º). A comparison of the pre and post intervention experimental group (n=16) means revealed a mean change of 3.8º (p= 0.18; d=0.34) (95% CI= 0.75 to 6.8º). The observed changes in ROM for both the experimental and control groups did not exceed the smallest detectable difference (SDD=5.9°). Conclusion: The application of the Still technique did not substantially alter ROM at the talocrural joint in all subjects. Rather there was a range of responses, some subjects did respond to the single treatment and further investigation into the characteristics of these responsive patients could be warranted.
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