An Industry Training Organisation perspective of strategic planning for future workplace learning and assessment innovation in New Zealand

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Authors
Patel, Reena
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Degree
Master of Educational Leadership and Management
Grantor
Unitec Institute of Technology
Date
2019
Supervisors
Cardno, Carol
Sheehan, Stephanie
Type
Masters Thesis
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
New Zealand
vocational education
Industry Training and Apprenticeships Act (1992 : New Zealand)
pre-employment preparation
Industry Based Learning (IBL)
work-integrated learning (WIL)
employability
university to work transition
Industry Training Organisations
Tertiary Education Strategy 2014–2019 (2014 : New Zealand)
Citation
Patel, R. (2019). An Industry Training Organisation perspective of strategic planning for future workplace learning and assessment innovation in New Zealand. An unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of the Master of Educational Leadership and Management, Auckland, New Zealand.
Abstract
RESEARCH QUESTIONS: 1. In what ways do Industry Training Organisations interpret Tertiary Education Commission’s strategy with reference to future workplace learning and assessment innovation? 2. What is the strategic planning for future workplace learning and assessment innovation in Industry Training Organisations? 3. What are the challenges experienced by Industry Training Organisations in relation to the strategic planning for future workplace learning and assessment innovation? Industry Training Organisations support workplace training by engaging with employers to provide training that meets industry needs. Research alludes to a changing workplace environment that is characterised by technological innovation, globalisation and changing demographics. The government is encouraging the tertiary education sector to be flexible and adaptive in responding to change. However, research points to today’s workers having less than five minutes a day to devote to professional development, yet learners are expected to have additional skillsets. This study aims to understand how middle-level and senior-level management interpret the Tertiary Education Strategy in the context of future workplace learning and assessment innovation, to explore strategic planning for future workplace learning and assessment innovation and to understand the challenges in implementing future workplace learning and assessment innovation in Industry Training Organisations in New Zealand. An interpretive approach was adopted for this qualitative study involving an in-depth investigation of eight participants’ views across five Industry Training Organisations. The research method used was semi-structured interviews. This research identifies innovation was unanimously defined as, “different ways of doing things”. However, it was applied subjectively. A key finding is that Industry Training Organisations believe they work closely with employers, clients and learners as part of their role despite there being no legislative requirement to plan for skills leadership. Another key finding confirms that Industry Training Organisations have experienced changes through advancements in technology, a changing workforce and globalisation themselves or within the industries they work with. Findings also indicate that regulatory quality assurance processes are viewed as one of the barriers to innovation. An implication of the study is that the government’s intended outcomes for innovation may or may not be met as innovation is applied subjectively. The study concludes that stringent regulatory quality requirements could stifle innovation and instil fear of the consequences of non-compliance within the Industry Training Organisations.
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