An investigation of test-retest reliability, internal consistency, construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects for the Rowley Self-Efficacy Breathing Scale (RoBE)

Loading...
Thumbnail Image
Other Title
Authors
Good, David
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Master of Osteopathy
Grantor
Unitec Institute of Technology
Date
2020
Supervisors
Moran, Robert
Verhoeff, Wesley
Type
Masters Thesis
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
dysfunctional breathing (DB)
breathing dysfunction
self-efficacy
self-care
Rowley Breathing Self-efficacy (RoBE)
RoBE
psychometric properties
measurement
evaluation
Rowley, Janet (N.Z. physiotherpist)
Nicholls, David (N.Z. physiotherapist)
Citation
Good, D. (2020). An investigation of test-retest reliability, internal consistency, construct validity, and floor and ceiling effects for the Rowley Self-Efficacy Breathing Scale (RoBE). (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Osteopathy). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealad. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4980
Abstract
Dysfunctional breathing (DB) is an overarching term used to describe a cluster of chronic breathing disorders that can occur either in excess or in the absence of other cardiopulmonary pathologies (Barker & Everard, 2015). Dyspnoea is the most common symptom associated with DB, however many non-respiratory symptoms may also occur (Boulding, Stacey, Niven, & Fowler, 2016). Though there is increasing awareness of DB amongst most medical fraternities, it still lacks a consensus-based definition (Boulding et al., 2016). Recent research has focused on improving the diagnostic tools available for the detection of DB, however, unlike many common pathologies, few resources have been dedicated to developing tools that could be useful to help people with DB manage their symptoms. Self-efficacy is well-known as a strong predictor of behaviour and drive. For people with chronic diseases such as DB, self-efficacy offers a cost-effective method with which to monitor and improve treatment response and adherence to self-care (Belil, Alhani, & Ebadi, 2018). The Rowley Breathing Self-efficacy (RoBE) scale was developed by New Zealand physiotherapists Janet Rowley and David Nicholls in 2006 to measure the self-efficacy of people with DB. Due to a lack of psychometric evaluation, the quality of the RoBE is largely unknown. This thesis is arranged into four main chapters: Chapter 1 is a literature review that outlines the definitions of DB and the different physiological domains that it influences, as well as a discussion of self-efficacy, how it relates to healthcare and the development of the RoBE scale. Chapter 2 contains a methodology segment that explores some pragmatic approaches on how to best measure the psychometric properties of the RoBE. Chapter 3 contains a manuscript reporting an investigation into the psychometric properties of the RoBE and is intended for submission to the Journal of Bodywork and Movement Therapies. The aim of the study reported in this manuscript was to determine the test-retest reliability, construct validity and internal consistency of the RoBE, and to determine the presence of any floor or ceiling effects. Finally, Chapter 4 contains Appendices in support of the thesis.
Publisher
Link to ePress publication
DOI
Copyright holder
Author
Copyright notice
All rights reserved
Copyright license
Available online at