Empirical evidence of the perceptions and behaviours by international tertiary students towards the future environment in New Zealand

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Authors
Botha, Christoff J.
Du Plessis, Andries
Chen, Jinming
Toh, William
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Grantor
Date
2014-09
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Type
Conference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedings
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
UUNZ Institute of Business (Auckland, N.Z.)
education for sustainability
tertiary students
business students
environment
opinion polls
conservation
Citation
Botha, C. J., Du Plessis, A. J., Chen, J., and Toh, W. (2014). Empirical evidence of the perceptions and behaviours by international tertiary students towards the future environment in New Zealand. SAIMS conference, 15-17 September, Muldersdrift, South Africa(Ed.), SAIMS 2014 (pp.Unavailable).
Abstract
The purpose of this research was to determine the perceptions of international students at an international tertiary institution, UUNZ, in Auckland New Zealand. A quantitative method was applied; 92 questionnaires were distributed amongst undergraduate- and post graduate international business students who were the target population. The research aims to establish what international students’ attitudes towards sustainability and the environment are in a foreign country. Some findings are: country of origin and age affect an individual’s thinking; thinking between nationalities and age groups is not significant; demographic factors affect an individual’s thinking patterns; different religions have similar perceptions regarding protection of natural resources. Similarities are discussed and differences of opinion identified; Positive and long term impacts of sustainable development were revealed; social and cultural impacts are found to be positive. Similarities are discussed and differences of opinion identified. Trends and then recommendations for tertiary institutions that are applicable globally form the last section before the conclusions.
Publisher
The Southern Africa Institute for Management Sciences (SAIMS)
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The Authors
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