Component level design and control of axial flux PM motor for in wheel applications

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Authors
Oke, Paul
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Date
2021-12-08
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Conference Contribution - Oral Presentation
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
permanent magnetic motors
vehicle propulsion
magnetic motors
ANZSRC Field of Research Code (2020)
Citation
Oke, P. (2021, December, 6-7). Component level design and control of axial flux PM motor for in wheel applications [Paper presentation]. 2021 MIT-Unitec Research Symposium – Rangahau Horonuku Hou - New Research Landscapes
Abstract
This paper presents the design and control of axial flux permanent magnet motor for in-wheel applications. The main objective is to implement a system-level design and control to achieve a pre-defined performance for the selected application. This paper addresses how to meet the pre-defined desired performance criteria. The AFPM motor differs from its radial flux permanent magnet motors mainly for the power-to-weight ratio estimated as 9 kilowatts per kilogram. This design produces an ultra-lightweight motor which further reduces the overall size and costs in applications like traction motors for hybrid and electric vehicles, wind and water turbines for electric power generators and other integrated starter motor/generators. First, a generic 3D CAD layout of an AFPM motor is presented, which can then be specified by the total speed and torque requirement for an application. A mathematical formulation to discover undesirable pole pairs leading to torque ripple compensation would be presented. This paper presents an integration method for AFPM that can be used in different electrified powertrains accounting for critical factors such as temperature cooling, inverter/converter performance, battery sizing and efficiency in driving cycles. The result shows unit testing and applicability of AFPM in different electrified power trains using component-level simulation and its overall system integration. The control design technique adopted for controlling the speed and torque is presented; this study implements field-weakening control strategies. The results show the applicability of AFPM on a traction motor using component-level simulation and its overall system integration.
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