Encompassing multiple moral paradigms: A challenge for nursing educators

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Authors
Caldwell, Elizabeth Shirin
Lu, Hongyan
Harding, Thomas
Author ORCID Profiles (clickable)
Degree
Grantor
Date
2010-03
Supervisors
Type
Journal Article
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
challenges
Chinese ethical philosophies
Judeo/Christian tradition
morally conflicting situations
non- European nursing students
nursing ethics
Citation
Caldwell, E., Hongyan, L., & Harding, T. (2010). Encompassing multiple moral paradigms: A challenge for nursing educators. Nursing Ethics, 17(2), 189-199. doi: 10.1177/0969733009355539
Abstract
Providing ethically competent care requires nurses to reflect not only on nursing ethics, but also on their own ethical traditions. New challenges for nurse educators over the last decade have been the increasing globalization of the nursing workforce and the internationalization of nursing education. In New Zealand, there has been a large increase in numbers of Chinese students, both international and immigrant, already acculturated with ethical and cultural values derived from Chinese Confucian moral traditions. Recently, several incidents involving Chinese nursing students in morally conflicting situations have led to one nursing faculty reflecting upon how moral philosophy is taught to non-European students and the support given to Chinese students in integrating the taught curriculum into real-life clinical practice settings. This article uses a case study involving a Chinese student to reflect on the challenges for both faculty members and students when encountering situations that present ethical dilemmas.
Publisher
Sage Publications
Link to ePress publication
DOI
10.1177/0969733009355539
Copyright holder
Sage Publications
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