Indigenous onto-epistemologies and pedagogies of care and affect in Aotearoa.

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Authors
Ritchie, Jenny
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Grantor
Date
2013
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Type
Journal Article
Ngā Upoko Tukutuku (Māori subject headings)
Keyword
eco-education
sustainability
climate change
early childhood
bicultural education
Citation
Ritchie, J. (2013). Indigenous onto-epistemologies and pedagogies of care and affect in Aotearoa. Global Studies of Childhood. 3(4) : 395-406
Abstract
This article reflects on research conducted in one kindergarten that was part of a wider project focusing on 'caring for ourselves, others and the environment' in early years education in Aotearoa New Zealand. The project drew upon Māori and western theoretical frames. In this article I respond to Bruno Latour's suggestion that we renew our theoretical considerations to make our practice more responsive to 'matters of concern'. The interlinked matters of concern that are the focus of this article are the endangered status of both indigenous peoples' worldviews and of the well-being of the planet. Early childhood teachers during the project introduced Māori (Indigenous) seasonal and healing practices within their daily pedagogies, in some small ways perhaps transcending the ongoing disruption and intergenerational trauma of the history of colonisation. It is argued that indigenous ways of being, knowing, and doing enact an ethic of biocentric relationality which, when applied through early childhood pedagogies, offer a source of hope in this era of anthropogenic climate crisis.
Publisher
Symposium Journals
Link to ePress publication
DOI
http://dx.doi.org/10.2304/gsch.2013.3.4.395
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Symposium Journals
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