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dc.contributor.authorAyallo, Irene
dc.date.accessioned2022-02-02T01:38:31Z
dc.date.available2022-02-02T01:38:31Z
dc.date.issued2021-12-23
dc.identifier.issn2463-4131
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/5506
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Action on family violence remains a policy priority for the New Zealand government. Accordingly, this article explores the Immigration New Zealand’s Victims of Family Violence (VFV) visa. Specifically, it explores possible barriers preventing MELAA2 cultural groups from utilizing the VFV visa. APPROACH: The discussion is based on administrative immigration data, gathered by Immigration New Zealand (INZ), on applicants for VFV visas between July 2010 and March 2021. FINDINGS: Over the last 10 years, INZ received 1,947 applications for the VFV Visa. People of Asian (40%) and Pacific (38%) backgrounds made most of these applications, with India, Fiji, China, the Philippines, and Tonga making up the top five source countries. MELAA communities made only 11% of the total VFV visa applications. Applicants from South Africa, Brazil, Iran, Nigeria, and Argentina made up the top five source MELAA countries. Analyses showed that MELAA applications were mostly work-type visas. IMPLICATIONS: Data presented shows that the VFV visa is still underutilised within these communities. Possible reasons for these notable outcomes are explored in this article, with suggestions for remediating strategies for barriers preventing MELAA communities from utilising the VFV visa. This article concludes that more research is required to gain an in depth understanding of the specific cultural contexts within which these women engage with this visa.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workersen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://anzswjournal.nz/anzsw/article/view/913/780en_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.subjectAotearoaen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectMiddle Eastern people in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectwomen with an ethnic backgrounden_NZ
dc.subjectethnic women and domestic violenceen_NZ
dc.subjectpartner violenceen_NZ
dc.subjectdomestic violenceen_NZ
dc.subjectVictims of Family Violence (VFV) visasen_NZ
dc.subjectpublic policyen_NZ
dc.subjectimmigration policiesen_NZ
dc.subjectLatin Americans in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectAfricans in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleIntersections of immigration law and family violence: Exploring barriers for ethnic migrant and refugee background womenen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2022-01-20T13:30:20Z
dc.rights.holderAotearoa New Zealand Association of Social Workersen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden4409 Social worken_NZ
dc.subject.marsden480402 Family lawen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden440709 Public policyen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationAyallo, I. (2021). Intersections of immigration law and family violence: Exploring barriers for ethnic migrant and refugee background women. Aotearoa New Zealand Social Work, 33(4), 55-64.en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage55en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage64en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume33en_NZ
unitec.publication.issue4en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleAotearoa New Zealand Social Worken_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms67885en_NZ
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0003-2442-8899en_NZ
unitec.publication.placeChristchurch, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaSocial Practiceen_NZ


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