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dc.contributor.authorRangiwai, Byron
dc.date.accessioned2021-07-08T02:42:27Z
dc.date.available2021-07-08T02:42:27Z
dc.date.issued2021
dc.identifier.issn1178-6035
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/5357
dc.description.abstractFood is a signifier of identity and status (Hayden, 1998, 2009; Hayden & Villeneuve, 2011; Neill et al., 2015). In traditional times, Māori consumed a range of hunted, gathered, and cultivated foods (Royal & Kaka-Scott, 2013). As a result of this diet, non-infectious diseases were low among Māori due to foods with higher levels of protective chemicals and nutrients (Cambie & Fergusson, 2003). Pākehā settlers brought new foods such as wheat and potatoes (see McFarlane, 2007; Wharemate, 2015; Zhu & He, 2020 concerning potatoes specifically), corn, cabbage, and other vegetables (Royal & Kaka-Scott, 2013). Pākehā also introduced sheep, pigs, goats, and poultry (Royal & Kaka-Scott, 2013). These new foods added variation to the Māori diet. Colonisation and land loss has negatively impacted Māori food sovereignty (Shirley, 2013), and poverty-related food insecurity damages Māori health (Beavis et al., 2018). In addition, due to the consumption of cheaper, processed foods, Māori experience inexplicably high levels of obesity and associated illnesses, such as type 2 diabetes (Glover et al., 2019; McKerchar et al., 2021). ... Enamel mugs Hāngi Boil up and dough boys Bread Kāuta Kererū Mīti tahu Kānga wai Pōkinikini Tuna Hākarien_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAuckland University of Technologyen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttps://www.tekaharoa.com/index.php/tekaharoa/article/view/359/324en_NZ
dc.rightsAll articles are made available using a Creative Commons (CC-BY-NC 4.0) worldwide shareable licence.en_NZ
dc.subjectAotearoaen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectMāori fooden_NZ
dc.subjectfooden_NZ
dc.subjectMāori healthen_NZ
dc.subjectfood insecurityen_NZ
dc.titleSome brief notes on kai Māorien_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.date.updated2021-06-30T14:30:22Z
dc.rights.holderAuthoren_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.24135/tekaharoa.v17i1.359en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden200207 Māori Cultural Studiesen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationRangiwai, B. (2021). Some Brief Notes on Kai Māori. Te Kaharoa: The eJournal on Indigenous Pacific Issues, 17(1), 1-29. doi:10.24135/tekaharoa.v17i1.359en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage1en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage29en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume17en_NZ
unitec.publication.issue1en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleTe Kaharoa: The eJournal on Indigenous Pacific Issuesen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms66453en_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuKaien_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuHauoraen_NZ
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9174-0009
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaCommunity and Health Servicesen_NZ


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