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dc.contributor.authorSingh, Baadshah
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-18T21:57:11Z
dc.date.available2019-07-18T21:57:11Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4623
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTION: How can social interactions be improved by integrating medium density housing, a commercial area and transport infrastructure in developing urban areas? Urbanisation is on the rise, and the least urbanised regions such as Asia have the fastest urban growth. Together China, India and Nigeria are expected to account for 37 percent of the 2.5 billion increase in urban population between 2014 and 2050. With an increase in both higher density development and land transport, social interactions in urban areas are often overlooked. Social isolation is a global issue. It is a core factor in mental and physical health problems, and economic disadvantage. From an architectural perspective, this specific urbanisation problem is due to past approaches to urban residential housing and infrastructure. Therefore the question arises, how can social interactions be improved by integrating medium density housing, a commercial area and transport infrastructure in developing urban areas? Therefore the question arises, how can social interactions be improved by integrating medium density housing, a commercial area and transport infrastructure in developing urban areas? Research shows that the street level is a major focus of communication and social interaction. In architecture, ideas have emerged, such as territorial differentiation and the living street. At the same time, transport and urban design research shows overall that there is common ground in the desire to reduce vehicles and increase public transport and walkability. In response, ideas such as new urbanism, transit orientated development and smart growth have emerged. The purpose of this study is: to explore the integration of these ideas to improve social interaction; to retain existing social spaces and develop those areas further; and to provide different levels of interaction ranging from the public environment to the more enclosed environments, such as the dwelling itself and the spaces in-between these areas. I will explore this problem with a case study located in India. In India, urbanisation can be seen through the increasing number of people moving from villages to developing urban areas consisting of developments that are gated and isolated from their environment such as apartments and single residential dwellings. Through urban analysis of Patiala, Punjab and literature and precedent analysis, the study will investigate how the integration of medium density housing and land transport infrastructure can improve social interactions. The addition of modelling and approach through design will result in providing a unique perspective in resolving the question.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectPatiala, Punjab, Indiaen_NZ
dc.subjectIndiaen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial interactionsen_NZ
dc.subjectpublic spacesen_NZ
dc.subjectmedium-density housingen_NZ
dc.subjecthousingen_NZ
dc.subjecturban transporten_NZ
dc.subjectpublic transporten_NZ
dc.subjectcommercial spacesen_NZ
dc.subjecturbanisationen_NZ
dc.titleThe merging city : creating a socially connected urban developmenten_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120508 Urban Designen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSingh, B. (2019). The merging city: Creating a socially connected urban development (Unpublished document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional)). Unitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealand. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10652/4623en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms109en_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalBradbury, Matthew
unitec.advisor.associatedIrving, Daniel
unitec.institution.studyareaArchitecture


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