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dc.contributor.authorJauny, Ray
dc.contributor.authorNeville, S.
dc.contributor.authorMontayre, J.
dc.contributor.authorWright-St Clair, V.
dc.date.accessioned2019-01-14T20:58:29Z
dc.date.available2019-01-14T20:58:29Z
dc.date.issued2018-11-05
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4451
dc.description.abstractRESEARCH QUESTION: What are the experiences of older migrants with mild cognitive impairment in New Zealand? BACKGROUND: Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a complex intermediate state of memory decline, which is widely acknowledged as a precursor to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, not all those diagnosed with MCI progress to AD, because many of those remains the same for life, but many recovers completely from it. MCI is an emerging primary target of aging research. MCI may have a significant impact on older migrants’ in relation to engagement from social activities, isolation, social disconnection, poor quality of life, and early retirement which can results in considerable socio-economic burden. Older migrants, are ethnically, culturally, linguistically diverse and are they are predisposed to psycho-social distress, loneliness, and trauma as well as physical health complications. Cultural factors, language barriers, and the resettlement process may all contribute to reduced cognition. AIM: As little is known on the experience of older migrants with MCI, this research will provide valuable information to better understand their lived experiences on this phenomenon. Research will help to better understand this condition, support shaping up strategies to sustain longer and better-quality life for older migrants. Method: Purposively sampled community-dwelling older migrants with MCI, aged 55 years old and over, will be recruited in Auckland’s region, to participate in semistructured interviews. Data will be inductively interpreted through a phenomenological lens that looks deeper and deeper into the reality of the world as it is experienced by older migrants. DISCUSSION: This research will provide a wealth of knowledge on the lived experience of older migrants’ with MCI. It is anticipated that learning from this research will help reduce a gap in knowledge, help to enhance professional practice and offer a culture-speci fic outcomes on improving quality health services for older migrants.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.rightsAll rights reserveden_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectolder migrants in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectmild cognitive impairment (MCI)en_NZ
dc.titleWhat is the lived experience of older migrants with mild cognitive impairmenten_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Oral Presentationen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-12-13T13:30:07Z
dc.subject.marsden110308 Geriatrics and Gerontologyen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationJauny, R., Neville, S., Montayre, J., & Wright-St Clair, V. (2018, September). What is the lived experience of older migrants with mild cognitive impairment. Paper presented at the New Zealand Association of Gerontology, "The Mosaic of Ageing" Conference, Auckland, New Zealand.en_NZ
unitec.conference.titleNZAG2018 CONFERENCE 6-8 September 2018 Ellerslie Event Centre, Auckland The Mosaic of Ageingen_NZ
unitec.conference.orgNew Zealand Association of Gerontologyen_NZ
unitec.conference.orgNew Zealand Association of Gerontology - Te Roopuen_NZ
unitec.conference.locationEllerslie Event Centre, Auckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2018-11-05
unitec.conference.edate2018-11-06
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationAuckland University of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms62872en_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaNursing


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