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dc.contributor.authorLipsham, T.
dc.contributor.authorDavies, Kathryn
dc.contributor.authorKestle, Linda
dc.contributor.editorDo, K., Sutrisna, M., Cooper-Cooke, B. & Olatunji. O.
dc.date.accessioned2018-12-13T20:31:27Z
dc.date.available2018-12-13T20:31:27Z
dc.date.issued2018-09
dc.identifier.isbn9780987183149
dc.identifier.isbn9780987183170
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4427
dc.description.abstractThe construction industry is widely recognised as very demanding of its workers, and fatigue is a common result. Long working hours, unreasonable deadlines, heavy workloads, lack of resources, and a macho work culture are common features of industry practices internationally which can be seen to contribute to this. At the same time, there are widespread concerns around workforce sustainability. Developing and maintaining a skilled workforce is a challenge for many employers, particularly in the current situation with a large cohort of aging workers leading to an imminent need for workforce renewal. This paper presents the results of an exploratory study into the conditions leading to fatigue and its impact on construction workers in Auckland, New Zealand. Participants described fatigue-related effects such as damaged relationships and increased workplace conflict, job dissatisfaction and poor work-life balance, as well as specific health and safety issues such as deteriorated vision, mental exhaustion and impaired decision-making leading to accidents. Managing fatigue in the face of the demanding work environment is a specific health and safety concern for older workers, given the physicality of many construction industry roles. For younger workers, while health and safety is still an issue, a potentially more important factor is the effect of fatigue on worker satisfaction and thus retention within the construction workforce, and how fatigue and its causes and consequences affect the image of the construction industry.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherCurtin University (Bentley, Western Australia)en_NZ
dc.rights© Copyright in individual articles contained in the Proceedings of the AUBEA Conference 2018 is vested in each of the author(s). Copyright for these proceedings is vested in Curtin University on behalf of AUBEA.en_NZ
dc.subjectAuckland (N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectconstruction workersen_NZ
dc.subjectfatigue managementen_NZ
dc.subjecthealth and safetyen_NZ
dc.subjectwork-life balanceen_NZ
dc.subjectwork hoursen_NZ
dc.subjectworker retentionen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleThe impact of fatigue on workforce sustainability in the construction industryen_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-12-11T13:30:10Z
dc.subject.marsden120201 Building Construction Management and Project Planningen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationLipsham, T., Davies, K., & Kestle, L. (2018). The impact of fatigue on workforce sustainability in the construction industry. In Do, K., Sutrisna, M., Cooper-Cooke, B. & Olatunji. O. (Ed.), 42nd Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA) Conference: Educating building professionals for the future in the globalised world , Vol. 3: Sustainability (pp. 73-82).en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage73en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage82en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume3: Sustainabilityen_NZ
unitec.publication.title42nd Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA) Conference: Educating building professionals for the future in the globalised worlden_NZ
unitec.conference.title42nd Australasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA) Conference: Educating building professionals for the future in the globalised worlden_NZ
unitec.conference.orgAustralasian Universities Building Education Association (AUBEA)en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgCurtain University (Bentley, Western Australia)en_NZ
unitec.conference.locationSingaporeen_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2018-09-26
unitec.conference.edate2018-09-28
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms62768en_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms63030
unitec.institution.studyareaConstruction + Engineering


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