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dc.contributor.authorTan, Leon
dc.contributor.editorGoldstein, L.
dc.contributor.editorFoss, S.
dc.date.accessioned2018-11-27T19:30:28Z
dc.date.available2018-11-27T19:30:28Z
dc.date.issued2017-11
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4398
dc.description.abstractMy talk is called “The Potential for Public Art in the Digital Near Future.” I just want to say near future, so we're not thinking 20 to 30 years ahead. Over the last two decades, I think it is fair to say that lots of institutions have increasingly adopted a whole bunch of digital technologies to start collecting and analyzing audience and visitor data. It’s also been adopted to extend participation and education initiatives. WESTAF's Public Art Archive is a brilliant example of precisely that. The uptake of the digital technology that enables public art projects—at least in institutional programming—has proceeded at a much slower pace. That is attributable perhaps to the difficulty and cost involved in provisioning public spaces with durable and secure digital infrastructures. I think that Jen [Lewin] can probably attest quite well to that, having had to create all of her own hardware. The widespread adoption of mobile devices and, in particular, those providing Internet access (mobile access exceeded desktop access in 2016), together with the declining cost of large-format digital display technologies, screen and projector technologies, and LEDs change this situation considerably—making possible the emergence of a range of public art projects such as Jen’s but also a number that I'll talk about very briefly. Blast Theories - I Like Frank (2004) Electroland - Enteractive (2006) Maurice Benayoun - Emotion Forecast (2010) John Craig Freeman and Greg Ulmer (Manifest.AR) - School Shooting eMorial (2013)en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWestern States Arts Federation (Denver, Colorado)en_NZ
dc.rightsAll rights reserveden_NZ
dc.subjectpublic arten_NZ
dc.subjectart in public spacesen_NZ
dc.subjectdigital technologies (DT)en_NZ
dc.subjectart and digital technologiesen_NZ
dc.subjectaugmented reality (AR)en_NZ
dc.subjectmobile technologyen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial mediaen_NZ
dc.subjectalienationen_NZ
dc.subjectTurkle, Sherry, (1948)-en_NZ
dc.titleThe future of technological advancements in public arten_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-11-21T13:30:02Z
dc.subject.marsden1999 Other Studies in the Creative Arts and Writingen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden080502 Mobile Technologiesen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationTan, L. (2017). The Future of Technological Advancements in Public Art. In Goldstein, L., Foss, S. (Ed.), The Future History of Public Art: A Symposium on Public Art [The 2017 Symposium of the Western States Arts Federation] (pp. 58-84).en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage58en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage84en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleThe Future History of Public Art: A Symposium on Public Arten_NZ
unitec.conference.titleThe Future History of Public Art: A Symposium on Public Art [The 2017 Symposium of the Western States Arts Federation]en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgWestern States Arts Federation (Denver, Colorado)en_NZ
unitec.conference.locationHonolulu, Hawai'ien_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2017-11-05
unitec.conference.edate2017-11-07
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms62701en_NZ
unitec.publication.placeDenver, Colorado, United Statesen_NZ
unitec.relation.urihttps://www.blasttheory.co.uk/projects/i-like-frank/en_NZ
unitec.relation.urihttps://www.electroland.net/enteractive/en_NZ
unitec.relation.urihttp://benayoun.com/moben/2011/12/27/emotion-forecast-for-urban-screen/en_NZ
unitec.relation.urihttps://johncraigfreeman.wordpress.com/school-shootings-emorial/en_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaDesign and Visual Arts


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