Show simple record

dc.contributor.authorSingh, Niranjan
dc.contributor.authorTawaketini, Jone
dc.contributor.editorC. Dulos
dc.date.accessioned2018-08-20T23:11:42Z
dc.date.available2018-08-20T23:11:42Z
dc.date.issued2018-01
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4349
dc.description.abstractThis paper explores whether the trades teaching curriculum focuses sufficiently on the entrepreneurial skills needed by present day vocational graduates, as evidence indicates that inclusion of entrepreneurial activities or even basic business skills are limited or non-existent. According to recent studies, degrees are failing to assure employment, high earnings, and upward social mobility for graduates unless they are able to operate within a commercial environment. In order to investigate this situation two data sources were analysed from the case study of a Bachelor of Applied Technology degree: Firstly, the extent to which course Learning Outcomes showed direct entrepreneurship content or demonstrated links to basic business practice. Secondly, whether entrepreneurship was subsequently examined in any of the related Assessment packages. It was clear from this analysis that many courses lacked any business practice in their curriculum content and furthermore, even where it did exist, there was a disconnection between the outcomes and their assessment. It became obvious that the programme did not satisfactorily meet the entrepreneurial needs of future employers. It is therefore recommended that in order to equip students with effective workplace learning practices, more emphasis on business skills is required to improve both cognitive development, and also to add value to the industry they will work in. Educational institutes through planned curriculum development can increase the quality and quantity of potential entrepreneurs and this will impact on their ability to operate in business. This paper recommends strategies for addressing the identified gapsen_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.rightsAll rights reserveden_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectBachelor of Applied Technology (BAT)en_NZ
dc.subjecttrades teaching curriculumen_NZ
dc.subjecttechnical and vocational education and training (TVET)en_NZ
dc.subjecttrade educatorsen_NZ
dc.subjectvocational educationen_NZ
dc.subjectvocational teachersen_NZ
dc.subjecttechnical teachersen_NZ
dc.subjecteducation for entrepreneurshipen_NZ
dc.subjectgraduate employabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectbusiness skillsen_NZ
dc.titleEntrepreneurship in vocational degrees : the missing linken_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.date.updated2018-08-10T14:30:07Z
dc.subject.marsden130213 Vocational Education and Training Curriculum and Pedagogyen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationSingh, N., & Tawaketini, J. (2018). Entrepreneurship in Vocational degrees: The missing link. In C. Dulos (Ed.), Papers of Asia Pacific Conference of Education, Teaching & Technology 2018 (pp. 76-81).en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage76en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage81en_NZ
unitec.publication.titlePapers of Asia Pacific Conference of Education, Teaching & Technology 2018en_NZ
unitec.conference.titlePapers of Asia Pacific Conference of Education, Teaching & Technology 2018en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgUnique Conferences Canadaen_NZ
unitec.conference.orgPangasinan State University (Phillipines)en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgInternational Center for Research & Development (Sri Lanka)en_NZ
unitec.conference.locationBangkok, Thailanden_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2018-01-25
unitec.conference.edate2018-01-26
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms61472en_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms61493
unitec.institution.studyareaEducation


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in

Show simple record