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dc.contributor.authorParsons, David
dc.contributor.authorLynch, J.
dc.contributor.authorHan, Binglan
dc.contributor.authorThorn, R.
dc.contributor.editorNew Zealand Tertiary Learning and Teaching Conference
dc.date.accessioned2018-03-22T23:28:27Z
dc.date.available2018-03-22T23:28:27Z
dc.date.issued2017-12
dc.identifier.isbn9781927214244
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/4168
dc.description.abstractCrowdsourcing is a twenty-first century phenomenon that relies on Web 2.0 technologies to enable the public to contribute to data gathering by organisations. It offers new ways of researching emerging topics that leverage the wisdom of crowds. Crowdsourcing originally developed as a way of identifying one or more ‘winning’ solutions from a crowd of contributors and tended to be product focused. Over time, however, a variety of definitions of crowdsourcing has evolved, differing in terms of the specific types of crowd, initiator and process. In this article, we explore the use of crowdsourcing as a research methodology, which involves outsourcing research tasks to large groups of self-selected people, both lay and expert. Unlike traditional surveys, crowdsourcing allows for a more iterative, idea-generating process, which can be more effective than other methods in future-focused research. We illustrate this approach using a case study – a project called Hack Education that was used to gather ideas about the future of education in New Zealand. This project used crowdsourcing both to gather and to analyse data. Our case study reveals that crowdsourcing can provide different perspectives and other ways of analysing the same domain of interest. In particular, our data suggests that the crowd is able to give a somewhat broader, overarching set of ideas than is available from other channels. As such, crowdsourcing may provide a useful complement to more traditional research methods.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherUnitec ePressen_NZ
dc.rightsHack education: Crowdsourcing the future of education in New Zealand by David Parsons, Jonathan Lynch, Binglan Han and Rochelle Thorn is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.en_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjecteducationen_NZ
dc.subjectpredictionsen_NZ
dc.subjectcrowdsourcingen_NZ
dc.subjectresearch methodologyen_NZ
dc.titleHack education : crowdsourcing the future of education in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.date.updated2017-12-21T13:30:19Z
dc.rights.holderAuthorsen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden13 Educationen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationParsons, D., Lynch, J., Han, B., & Thorn, R. (2017, December). Hack Education: Crowdsourcing the future of education in New Zealand. In S. Nash and L.L.M. Patston (Eds.), Spaces and Pedagogies: New Zealand Tertiary Learning and Teaching Conference 2017 Proceedings ((pp. 57-66). Unitec ePress.en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage26en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage36en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleSpaces and Pedagogies: New Zealand Tertiary Learning and Teaching Conference 2017 Proceedingsen_NZ
unitec.conference.titleSpaces and Pedagogies: New Zealand Tertiary Learning and Teaching Conference 2017en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.conference.locationUnitec Institute of Technology, Auckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2017-12-13
unitec.conference.edate2017-12-13
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms61050en_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms61094
unitec.identifier.roms61344
unitec.identifier.roms63000
unitec.relation.epresshttp://www.unitec.ac.nz/epress/wp-content/uploads/2017/12/NTLT-Spaces-and-Pedagogies.pdfen_NZ
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9815-036X
unitec.publication.placeAuckland, New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaEducation


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