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dc.contributor.authorMarsden, Nicholas
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Niranjan
dc.contributor.authorClarke, David
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-22T20:34:21Z
dc.date.available2017-03-22T20:34:21Z
dc.date.issued2016-04
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3680
dc.description.abstractCritical thinking can be said to be among the louder ‘buzz phrases’ in education in the 21st century. Both critical thinking and communication are key employability skills. Whilst there is a body of research on critical thinking, and its role in pedagogy, there seems to be a dearth of research linking second language ability and critical thinking. This area probably needs further examination given that it relates to subject specific discourse. Moreover the debate about domain-specific and generalist critical thinking skills is arguably impacted by language in ways that could disadvantage non-native English speakers in their assessed work. This research, carried out with Automotive students in New Zealand, suggests the language support currently given on a Bachelor level course in Automotive may not be adequate, and might need to be made available in different ways because perceptions of language ability may impact on success. The findings from this project suggest that automotive students might in fact prefer more language support. This information would be useful for course designers and facilitators at institutions elsewhere, particularly where courses might attract large numbers of non-native speakers either as international or domestic students. In either case, their perceived needs and expectations on the level of language support required to succeed are a focal point of this project.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherAustralian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA)en_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectBachelor of Applied Technology (BAT)en_NZ
dc.subjectvocational educationen_NZ
dc.subjectTVET studentsen_NZ
dc.subjectcritical thinkingen_NZ
dc.subjectlanguage supporten_NZ
dc.subjectautomotive educationen_NZ
dc.subjectgraduate employabilityen_NZ
dc.subjectnon-native speakers of Englishen_NZ
dc.titleTo what extent is critical thinking affected by language demands in a level seven technical degree course?en_NZ
dc.typeConference Contribution - Paper in Published Proceedingsen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130213 Vocational Education and Training Curriculum and Pedagogyen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMarsden, N., Singh, N. & Clarke, D. (2016, April). To what extent is critical thinking affected by language demands in a level seven technical degree programme? Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA) (Ed.), 19th Annual Conference of Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (pp.75-77).en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage75en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage77en_NZ
unitec.publication.title19th Annual Conference of Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (2016)en_NZ
unitec.conference.title19th Annual Conference of Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (2016)en_NZ
unitec.conference.orgAustralian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA)en_NZ
unitec.conference.locationNorthern Sydney Institute of TAFE NSW, Australiaen_NZ
unitec.conference.sdate2016-08-20
unitec.conference.edate2016-08-22
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms59023en_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms59562
unitec.identifier.roms59567
unitec.institution.studyareaEducation


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