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dc.contributor.authorMack, Michael
dc.contributor.authorTowns, Marcy H.
dc.date.accessioned2016-08-25T19:46:34Z
dc.date.available2016-08-25T19:46:34Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.issn1756-1108
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3547
dc.description.abstractWe report the results of a phenomenographic analysis of faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching upper-division physical chemistry courses in the undergraduate curriculum. A purposeful sampling strategy was used to recruit a diverse group of faculty for interviews. Collectively, the participating faculty regularly teach or have taught physical chemistry courses in 16 different chemistry departments in the United States. While faculty agreed that the goal of teaching physical chemistry was to help students develop robust conceptual knowledge of the subject matter within thermodynamics, statistical mechanics, quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, chemical kinetics, and other major topics, some articulated strong beliefs about epistemic and social learning goals. An understanding of the relations between different ways of thinking about teaching upper-division physical chemistry courses offers practitioners with alternative perspectives that may help them expand their awareness of the purposes for teaching physical chemistry in the undergraduate curriculum. Furthermore, knowledge of faculty beliefs about their teaching provides educational researchers and curriculum developers with an understanding about the potential opportunities or barriers for helping faculty align their beliefs and goals for teaching with research-based instructional strategies. We discuss our findings with the intention to expand faculty awareness of the discourse on physical chemistry education to include various perspectives of the purpose for teaching upper-division physical chemistry courses.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherRoyal Society of Chemistryen_NZ
dc.rightsThis journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2016en_NZ
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/*
dc.subjectUnited Statesen_NZ
dc.subjectphysical chemistry educationen_NZ
dc.subjectchemistry educationen_NZ
dc.subjectsocial learningen_NZ
dc.subjectepistemologyen_NZ
dc.subjectsurveysen_NZ
dc.titleFaculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching undergraduate physical chemistry coursesen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderRoyal Society of Chemistryen_NZ
dc.identifier.doiDOI: 10.1039/c5rp00148jen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogyen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationMack, M.R., & Towns, M.H. (2016). Faculty beliefs about the purposes for teaching undergraduate physical chemistry courses. Chemistry Education Research and Practice, 17, pp.80-99. DOI: 10.1039/c5rp00148jen_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.institutionPurdue University (West Lafayette, Indiana)en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage80en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage99en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume17en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleChemistry Education Research and Practiceen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms59160en_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaEducation


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