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dc.contributor.authorGremillion, Helen
dc.contributor.authorTolich, Martin
dc.contributor.authorBathurst, Ralph
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-07T00:13:19Z
dc.date.available2016-07-07T00:13:19Z
dc.date.issued2015
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3467
dc.description.abstractSince the 1988 Cartwright Inquiry, lay members of ethics committees have been tasked with ensuring that ordinary New Zealanders are not forgotten in ethical deliberations. Unlike Institutional Review Boards (IRBs, or ethics committees) in North America, where lay members constitute a fraction of ethics committee membership, 50% of most New Zealand ethics committees are comprised of lay members. Lay roles are usually defined in very broad terms, which can vary considerably from committee to committee. This research queries who lay representatives are, what they do, and what if anything they represent. Our findings are based on data collection with 12 participants: eight semi-structured interviews with lay members from diverse types of ethics committees who described their roles, and commentary from four ethics committee chairs, three of these lay members who commented on this article’s final draft. Findings indicate that the role of New Zealand lay persons – although distinctively valued – is otherwise similar to the documented role of lay persons within North American ethics committees. Lay members see their role as primarily protecting the interests of their institutions. However, in spite of their numbers, most lay members do not see themselves as representing any particular constituent groups or institutionally unaffiliated areas of concern. On tertiary education committees especially, there is a good deal of ambiguity in the lay role.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherSage Publicationsen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://rea.sagepub.com/content/11/2/82.full.pdf+htmlen_NZ
dc.rights© The Author(s) 2015en_NZ
dc.subjectCartwright Inquiry 1987-1988 (N.Z.)en_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealand. Committee of Inquiry into Allegations concerning the Treatment of Cervical Cancer at National Women's Hospital and into other related matters.en_NZ
dc.subjectresearch ethics committeesen_NZ
dc.subjectlay personsen_NZ
dc.subjectlay membersen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealand research ethics committeesen_NZ
dc.subjectnon-affiliated membersen_NZ
dc.subjectNorth Americaen_NZ
dc.subjectInstitutional Review Boards (IRBs)en_NZ
dc.titleLay members of New Zealand research ethics committees : who and what do they represent?en_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderAuthorsen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1747016115581723en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden220107 Professional Ethics (incl. police and research ethics)en_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationGremillion, H., Tolich, M., & Bathurst, R. (2015). Lay members of New Zealand research ethics committees: Who and what do they represent?. Research Ethics, 11(2), pp.82-97. doi:10.1177/1747016115581723en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.institutionUniversity of Otago (Dunedin, N.Z.)en_NZ
unitec.institutionMassey Universityen_NZ
unitec.publication.spage82en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage97en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume11(2)en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleResearch Ethicsen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationMassey Universityen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms58068en_NZ
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-9219-2366en_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaSocial Practice


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