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dc.contributor.authorFarnworth, Mark
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Lorelle
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Nigel
dc.contributor.authorBeausoleil, N.J.
dc.contributor.authorWeidgraaf, K.
dc.contributor.authorHekman, M.
dc.contributor.authorChambers, J.P.
dc.contributor.authorThomas, D.G.
dc.contributor.authorWaran, N.K.
dc.contributor.authorStafford, K.J.
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-30T05:44:04Z
dc.date.available2016-06-30T05:44:04Z
dc.date.issued2015-02-14
dc.identifier.issn1467-2995
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3455
dc.description.abstractOBJECTIVE: To assess the potential of a thermal carbon dioxide (C02) laser to explore antinociception in pain-free cats. STUDY DESIGN: Experimental. prospective, blinded, randomlsed study ANIMALS: Sixty healthy adult female cats with a (mean ± standard deviation) weight of 3.3 ± 0.6 kg. METHODS: Cats were systematically allocated to one of six treatments: saline 0.2 mL per cat; morphine 0.5 mg kg-1; buprenorphine 20 mcg kg-1; medetomidine 2 mcg kg-1 ; tramadol 2 mg kg-1, and ketoprofen 2 mg kg-1. Latency to respond to thermal stimulation was assessed at baseline and at intervals of 15–30, 30–45, 45–60, 60–75, 90–105 and 120–135 minutes. Thermal thresholds were assessed using time to respond behaviourally to stimulation with a 500 mW CO2 laser. Within-treatment differences in response latency were assessed usingFriedman’s test. Differences amongst treatments were assessed using independent Kruskal–Wallistests. Where significant effects were identified, pair-wise comparisons were conducted to elucidate the direction of the effect. RESULTS: Cats treated with morphine ( [symbol] 2= 12.90, df = 6, p = 0.045) and tramadol (symbol] 2= 20.28, df = 6, p = 0.002) showed significant increases in latency to respond. However, subsequent pairwise comparisons indicated that differences in latencies at specific time-points were significant (p < 0.05) only for tramadol at 60–75 and 90–105 minutes after administration (21.9 and 43.6 seconds, respectively) in comparison with baseline (11.0 seconds). No significant pairwise comparisons were found within the morphine treatment. Injections of saline, ketoprofen, medetomidine or buprenorphine showed no significant effect on latency to respond. The CO2 laser technique may have utility in the assessment of thermal nociceptive thresholds in pain-free cats after analgesic administration and may provide a simpler alternative to existing systems. Further exploration is required to examine its sensitivity and comparative utility.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherWiley Online Libraryen_NZ
dc.rights© 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesia.en_NZ
dc.subjectdomestic cats (Felis catus)en_NZ
dc.subjectfemale catsen_NZ
dc.subjectcats (Felis catus)en_NZ
dc.subjectanalgesiaen_NZ
dc.subjectCO2 lasersen_NZ
dc.subjectnociception testsen_NZ
dc.titleAssessment of a carbon dioxide laser for the measurement of thermal nociceptive thresholds following intra-muscular administration of analgesic drugs to pain-free female catsen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holder© 2015 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesia and Analgesiaen_NZ
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/vaa.12245en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden070701 Veterinary Anaesthesiology and Intensive Careen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationFarnworth, M. J., Barrett, L. A., Adams, N. J., Beausoleil, N. J., Weldgraaf, K., Hekmann, M., Chambers, J. P., Thomas, D. G., Waran, N. K., & Stafford, K. J. (2015). Assessment of a carbon dioxide laser for the measurement of thermal nociceptive thresholds following intra-muscular administration of analgesic drugs to pain-free female cats. Journal of Veterinary Analgesia, 42 (6), pp.638-647. doi:10.1111/vaa.12245en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.institutionMassey Universityen_NZ
unitec.institutionUniversity of Edinburgh (Scotland)en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage638en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage647en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume42 (6)en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleJournal of Veterinary Analgesiaen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms57140en_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaNatural Sciences


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