Show simple record

dc.contributor.authorLovell, Sarah A.
dc.contributor.authorEgan, Richard
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Lindsay
dc.contributor.authorHicks, Karen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-16T21:26:01Z
dc.date.available2016-06-16T21:26:01Z
dc.date.issued2015-06
dc.identifier.issn1172-6164
dc.identifier.issn1172-6156
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3434
dc.description.abstractINTRODUCTION: Almost a decade on from the New Zealand Primary Health Care Strategy and amidst concerns about funding of health promotion, we undertook a nationwide survey of health promotion providers. AIM: To identify trends in recruitment and turnover in New Zealand’s health promotion workforce. METHODS: Surveys were sent to 160 organisations identified as having a health focus and employing one or more health promoter. Respondents, primarily health promotion managers, were asked to report budget, retention and hiring data for 1 July 2009 through 1 July 2010. RESULTS: Responses were received from 53% of organisations. Among respondents, government funding for health promotion declined by 6.3% in the year ended July 2010 and health promoter positions decreased by 7.5% (equalling 36.6 full-time equivalent positions). Among staff who left their roles, 79% also left the field of health promotion. Forty-two organisations (52%) reported employing health promoters on time-limited contracts of three years or less; this employment arrangement was particularly common in public health units (80%) and primary health organisations (57%). Among new hires, 46% (n=55) were identified as Māori. DISCUSSION: Low retention of health promoters may reflect the common use of limited-term employment contracts, which allow employers to alter staffing levels as funding changes. More than half the surveyed primary health organisations reported using fixed-term employment contracts. This may compromise health promotion understanding, culture and institutional memory in these organisations. New Zealand’s commitment to addressing ethnic inequalities in health outcomes was evident in the high proportion of Māori who made up new hires.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherRoyal New Zealand College of General Practitionersen_NZ
dc.relation.urihttp://www.publish.csiro.au/?act=view_file&file_id=HC15153.pdfen_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealanden_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/*
dc.subjecthealth promotionen_NZ
dc.subjectpublic healthen_NZ
dc.subjecthealth policyen_NZ
dc.subjectworkforceen_NZ
dc.subjectemploymenten_NZ
dc.subjectretentionen_NZ
dc.titleHealth promotion funding, workforce recruitment and turnover in New Zealanden_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderRoyal New Zealand College of General Practitionersen_NZ
dc.identifier.doidoi:10.1071/HC15153en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden111712 Health Promotionen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationLovell, S.A., Egan, R., Robertson, L., & Hicks, K. (2015). Health promotion funding, workforce recruitment and turnover in New Zealand. Journal of Primary Health Care, 7(2), pp.153-157en_NZ
unitec.institutionUniversity of Canterburyen_NZ
unitec.institutionUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
unitec.institutionHealth Promotion Forum of New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.publication.spage153en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage157en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume7(2)en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleJournal of Primary Health Careen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Canterburyen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUniversity of Otagoen_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationHealth Promotion Forum of New Zealanden_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms57980en_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuKaimahi (Ora)mi_NZ
dc.identifier.orcid0000-0002-7274-9745en_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaHealth Sciences


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in

Show simple record


 Unitec Institute of Technology, Private Bag 92025, Victoria Street West, Auckland 1142