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dc.contributor.authorCruickshank, Prue
dc.contributor.authorDupuis, Ann
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-03T01:24:13Z
dc.date.available2016-06-03T01:24:13Z
dc.date.issued2015-09-15
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/3408
dc.description.abstractObjective: This paper describes the experiences of a group of intentional immigrant entrepreneurs (IIEs) who have successfully set up a business within three years of arrival in a new country. It shows how various forms of symbolic capital are successfully deployed at each stage of the entrepreneurial process and asserts that the study of intentional, well-resourced immigrants, can contribute to understanding immigrant entrepreneurs’ adaptation to their new settings and also inform immigration policy. Research Design & Methods: Qualitative in-depth interviews were conducted with a sample of New Zealand intentional immigrant entrepreneurs. The iterative analytical process used revealed the various dimensions of symbolic capital necessary for adaptation to the host country and to fulfilling visa requirements to gain residency. Findings: This paper demonstrates that the successful adaptation of IIEs, while in the first instance requiring adequate financial capital, also requires the strategic use of human, cultural and social capital, in different ways and at different times in the entrepreneurial process, to overcome the obstacles and barriers to success. Implications & Recommendations: As immigration policy makers seek to balance global migrant pressures and international obligations against internal national eco- nomic and political demands, the results of this study could resonate with both global policy analysts and scholars engaged in immigrant entrepreneurship. Contribution & Value Added: This article adds to the relatively small body of scholarship on IIEship, particularly those who, unlike the majority of immigrant entrepreneurs, do not establish a business within ethnic communities.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.publisherCentre for Strategic and International Entrepreneurship (Krakow, Poland)en_NZ
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 New Zealand*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/3.0/nz/*
dc.subjectintentional immigrant entrepreneurs (IIE)en_NZ
dc.subjectforms of capitalen_NZ
dc.subjectimmigrant entrepreneurs adaptationen_NZ
dc.subjectentrepreneurshipen_NZ
dc.subjectentrepreneur visasen_NZ
dc.subjectmodellingen_NZ
dc.subjectadaptationen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.subjectBourdieu, Pierre (1930-2002)
dc.titleThe adaptation of intentional immigrant entrepreneurs : a case studyen_NZ
dc.typeJournal Articleen_NZ
dc.rights.holderAuthorsen_NZ
dc.identifier.doiDOI: 10.15678/EBER.2015.030305en_NZ
dc.subject.marsden150304 Entrepreneurshipen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationCruickshank, P., & Dupuis, A. (2015). The Adaptation of Intentional Immigrant Entrepreneurs: A Case Study. Entrepreneurial Business and Economics Review, 3 (3), pp.77-93. doi:10.15678/EBER.2015.030305en_NZ
unitec.institutionUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.institutionMassey University (Auckland, N.Z.)en_NZ
unitec.publication.spage77en_NZ
unitec.publication.lpage93en_NZ
unitec.publication.volume3 (3)en_NZ
unitec.publication.titleEntrepreneurial Business and Economics Reviewen_NZ
unitec.peerreviewedyesen_NZ
unitec.identifier.roms58598en_NZ
unitec.institution.studyareaManagement and Marketing


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