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dc.contributor.authorBridges, Trudi
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-06T19:57:43Z
dc.date.available2015-01-06T19:57:43Z
dc.date.issued2014en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/2518
dc.description.abstractThis research investigates the impact inclement weather has on outdoor events and the project planning implications for event managers. How well do event managers plan for inclement weather and how many just hope for the best? In March 2012 hundreds of New Zealanders had their weekend plans disrupted due to an impending ‘weather bomb’. The Met Service had issued a strong wind warning with gusts of 120km/h predicted along with heavy rain. The role of the event manager is to deliver the event according to the event scope and organisational goals and objectives through the development of an event plan (Getz, 2012). This is achieved through the event management framework of the development phase, operational planning phase, implementation, monitoring and management phase followed by an evaluation of the event (Mallen & Adams, 2008). Closely aligned is the contingency planning framework of identifying and managing risk. Contingency planning is the advanced preparation of action to meet unexpected events that could significantly impact the occasion should they occur. For every aspect of the event there should be a contingency plan. To discover how well event managers’ plan for inclement weather a questionnaire aligned to the event management process was developed to explore event managers’ preparedness for the effects of weather on their events. Fifteen event managers of outdoor events from throughout New Zealand participated in the research. Potentially there will be those whose events have suffered detrimentally to inclement weather conditions and those that have not. Results showed event managers in New Zealand are well aware of the perils Mother Nature can deliver to an event. There was evidence the event managers have good monitoring systems in place to monitor impending weather conditions. They are also cognisant of the need to provide shelter and protection from the elements for their patrons. The research results indicated elements of weakness when planning for contingency in the areas of budget setting and seeking appropriate weather insurance to protect an organisation from potential financial losses that inclement weather may bring.en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.rightsAll rights reserveden_NZ
dc.subjectevents planningen_NZ
dc.subjectrisk managementen_NZ
dc.subjectcontingency planningen_NZ
dc.subjectevents managersen_NZ
dc.subjectinclement weatheren_NZ
dc.subjectweather forecastingen_NZ
dc.subjectspecial eventsen_NZ
dc.subjectentertainment eventsen_NZ
dc.subjectNew Zealanden_NZ
dc.titleExploring contingency planning for adverse weather conditions : how well do event managers plan for inclement weather?en_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
dc.rights.holderAuthoren_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Businessen_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden1599 Other Commerce, Management, Tourism and Servicesen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationBridges, T. (2014). Exploring contingency planning for adverse weather conditions : how well do event managers plan for inclement weather? An unpublished thesis submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Masters of Business (MBus).en_NZ
unitec.pages112en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalMitchell, Helen
unitec.institution.studyareaManagement and Marketing
dc.identifier.wikidataQ112904655


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