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dc.contributor.authorHutana, Steve
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-25T21:58:10Z
dc.date.available2012-04-25T21:58:10Z
dc.date.issued2011en_NZ
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10652/1826
dc.description.abstractHow do urban marae(2) fulfil contemporary Maori urban needs? What processes do urban Maori engage to negotiate and plan for future needs? And how do designers and architects engage with these communities in culturally appropriate, meaningful ways? This dissertation explores the use of traditional Maori forms within contemporary urban design; proposes Maori architecture as a culturally distinct tradition; and develops a specific design proposal for an urban Maori community. The research develops out of personal and family experiences of urban migration and separation of Maori communities from their ancestral homelands. This project is further contextualised in relation to historical accounts of Apirana Ngata’s social reformation policies, to Princess Te Puea Herangi’s grass roots approach to development within Tainui. Both these initiatives helped to advance Maori architecture through different building projects. The research also draws on discussions with whanau and iwi representatives from Te Whanau a Te Aotawarirangi (TWOTA) and Te Taurahere Ngati Porou ki Tamaki (NPKT), Papakura Pan Urban Marae (PPUM), and Te Noho Kotahitanga. The research includes: •A review of related literature on Matauranga Maori and Maori design •Personal reflection on work processes in sketch journals •Drawing and conceptual modelling with digital clay (massing), in Revit architecture, i-phone applications, digital photography and Photoshop as well as traditional sketch mediums, laser cutting and physical 3-d modelling, and virtual architecture through augmented reality. Outcomes of this research may be used to inform Ngāti Porou ki Tamaki plans for a new urban marae, and provide reference material to other groups wishing to engage tikanga and kaupapa Māori in contemporary design contexts. 2. The Marae is a turangawaewae (place for people to stand) on Papatuanuku (mother earth) and speak to the living and those who have passed on. It is a wahi rangatira mana (place of greatest mana), wahi rangatira wairua (place of greatest spirituality), wahi rangatira iwi (place of dignity) and rangatira tikanga Maori (Ultimate expression of Maori customs). The Marae is a place for Tangata whenua (people of the land,) to host manuhiri (visitors) in Hui (meetings), Tangi (funeral) and celebrations together. Hospitality is a key part of Marae in hosting guests with Kai (food) served in the Whare Kai (dining room), meeting and sleep in the Wharenui (meeting house) and Whare Paku (ablutions). H. Tauroa and P. Tauroa, Te Marae: A guide to customs and protocol (Penguin Group New Zealand Limited, 2009).en_NZ
dc.language.isoenen_NZ
dc.subjectmarae designen_NZ
dc.subjecturban maraeen_NZ
dc.subjectMāori architectureen_NZ
dc.subjectcommunity engagementen_NZ
dc.titleHamo Te Rangi : design for a contemporary urban maraeen_NZ
dc.typeMasters Thesisen_NZ
thesis.degree.nameMaster of Architecture (Professional)en_NZ
thesis.degree.levelMastersen_NZ
thesis.degree.grantorUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.marsden120101 Architectural Designen_NZ
dc.identifier.bibliographicCitationHutana, S. (2011). Hamo Te Rangi : Design for a contemporary urban marae Master Thesis Explanatory Document. An explanatory document submitted in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Architecture (Professional), Unitec Institute of Technology.en_NZ
unitec.pages100en_NZ
dc.contributor.affiliationUnitec Institute of Technologyen_NZ
dc.subject.tukutukuHoahoanga wharemi_NZ
unitec.advisor.principalAustin, Michael
unitec.advisor.associatedHoskins, Raoul
unitec.institution.studyareaArchitecture


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